Depression, Dogs, Grief, Service animals

“Creating beautiful memories”

"Creating happy memories" is a new idea for me that I culled from Korean romantic comedy. Consciously setting out to create things that you are going to store up for a rainy day. I had never heard of this. It is a useful idea, my favorite kind, and I've been futzing with it in the back of my subconscious. The thing that I like best about it is the fact that it appears that this is how my memory works. My memories are never exact video footage. Instead there is a collage of photographs and video clips, just like they show at the end of these shows.

Bipolar health, Humor, Living within limitations, Wisdom, Writing a blog

Why I don’t know what I’m talking about

"Those who know do not talk. Those who talk do not know." This is food for thought for those of us who write blogs, talk more than our fair share, or have been told that they write well. What does Lao Tzu say that is specifically uplifting and useful for those of us who choose to write publicly? Not just in a beautiful, abstract-chinese-landscape-philosophical way but also in common sense, nuts and bolts fashion? And what would Lao Tzu say about writing about bipolar disorder?

Depression, Living within limitations, Mania, Mythology, Poetry, Stories

Navigating between two disasters – Part 1. Skylla and Charybdis

This is the first of two posts about the myth of Skylla and Charybdris. In this first post the myth itself is detailed, with many beautiful illustrations. The second post will explore what lessons this myth can teach us about living with bipolar disorder. What do we do when faced with what seems to be a forced choice between two dangerous outcomes -- the dilemma in which Odysseus was placed on his long journey home. As Odysseus asks Circe, “Come then, goddess, answer me truthfully this: is there some way for me /to escape away from deadly Charybdis, but yet fight the other one off, when she attacks my companions?”

Wisdom, Writing a blog

How do we describe experiences that are beyond words?

It is daunting to try and talk about experiences that cannot be put into words. There are many parts of the experiences of mania and depression that are impossible to describe accurately or in a way that can jump across the interpersonal void to someone who has not experienced it themselves. What is it like to have lightning course through your veins? To be caught in the timeless, hopeless, prison of depression. Or more practically, how can we describe the ripple effect that bipolar disorder has through all aspects of a person's life and throughout their lifetime? It is good to remember that the task set forth in this webpage is fundamentally impossible but worthwhile nonetheless.